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Clone of Painting the Myrmidons, Part 3

Tue, 06/30/2015 - 15:39
Type: FeaturesAuthor: Daniel GelonSubtitle: Bringing Elemental Evil to LifeBanner: Thumbnail (869x490): Text: 

Art Director Daniel Gelon details the next stage in the Earth Myrmidon painting process. In this segment, we see dramatic results as Daniel paints the armor and base. Watch the step-by-step now.

 

video-sundering

Painting the Myrmidons: Part 3


Publication date: 07/01/2015Introduction: Daniel Gelon continues the painting process of Gale Force Nine’s earth myrmidon.Tags: FeaturesRelated content: Elemental Evilexternal_urls: Texture banner: ShowBanner video: 

June Survey

Tue, 06/30/2015 - 11:00
Type: FeaturesAuthor: Mike MearlsSubtitle: Another month brings another D&D feedback survey!Banner: Thumbnail (869x490): Text: 

Our last survey asked you to name which spells were proving problematic in your campaigns. We collected the responses as write-in text, rather than a checklist, so it will take some time to organize the results. We hope to have those results for you next month.

We also asked about the new options presented in the Waterborne Adventures installment of Unearthed Arcana. Overall, that material scored very well—on a par with material from the Player’s Handbook. Areas where players experienced trouble were confined to specific mechanics. The minotaur race’s horns created a bit of confusion, for example, and its ability score bonuses caused some unhappiness. On a positive note, people really liked the sample bonds and how they helped bring out the minotaur’s unique culture.

The mariner, the swashbuckler, and the storm sorcerer also scored very well. A few of the specific mechanics for those options needed some attention, but overall, players and DMs liked using them.

Finally, we asked a few questions about the Dragon+ app. We really appreciate the feedback as we tailor the app’s content and chart the course for future issues. The overall feedback has been quite positive, and we’re looking at making sure we continue to build on our initial success.

The Latest Survey

This month, we’re activating a time machine and checking in to see what sort of content from prior editions you want to see adapted to fifth edition. Our latest survey has questions touching on classic settings, classes, and races. Though we can’t promise that everyone’s favorite content will be adapted,  knowing what specific content players and DMs are looking to add to their campaigns will help determine the direction of future Unearthed Arcana articles.

Publication date: 06/30/2015Tags: FeaturesRelated content: TRPG_DMGTRPG_PHBexternal_urls: Texture banner: ShowBanner video: 

Elemental Evil: Set 3 (Water)

Mon, 06/29/2015 - 14:25
Description: Members of this cult seek to harness the power of Olhydra, the Princess of Evil Water, and drown the world with typhoons, tidal waves, and torrential rain. Picture: Type: WallpapersDisplay Mode thumbnail: LargeTitle: Elemental Evil: Cult of the Crushing WaveImage : 

Create a Spell Component

Fri, 06/26/2015 - 13:36
Type: FeaturesAuthor: Shelly MazzanobleSubtitle: Community PollBanner: Thumbnail (869x490): Text: 

The Underdark is a labyrinth of mystery, madness, and macabre creatures. Few dare enter and even fewer return.

This fall, adventurers are being called upon to descend into this subterranean world and help thwart an insanity so powerful, so pervasive, that it will shake the Forgotten Realms to its very core.

Preparation is key as the Underdark isn’t exactly tourist friendly. You don’t want to find yourself down to single digit hit points, only to discover that your spellcaster can’t cast chain lightening because they’re short three silver pins. 

What if you could help by creating alternate material spell components easily found in the Underdark? What if we said you can? That’s right— we’re asking you to create an alternate material spell component for an item not readily available in the Underdark with one that would be. For instance, oak bark might not be easy to hunt down in the Underdark, but petrified mushroom shavings sure are. Don’t have a handful of thorns? How about a spool of spider silk instead? Teleport yourself to an underground mini-mart and tell us what alternate Underdark material spell components you find. Please provide the spell name, its current material component, and the alternative material component found in the Underdark.

Your submission may appear in a future issue of Dragon+ or on a D&D social media site.

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Publication date: 06/30/2015Introduction: Casting spells in the Underdark is no easy feat...Tags: FeaturesRelated content: Rage of Demonsexternal_urls: Texture banner: ShowBanner video: 

Strongholds

Fri, 06/26/2015 - 11:00
Type: FeaturesAuthor: Bart Carroll, Shelly Mazzanoble, Trevor Kidd, Greg TitoSubtitle: D&D PodcastBanner: Thumbnail (869x490): Text: 

To find out more about this episode's topics:

Neverwinter MMO

Rob Overmeyer serves as Executive Producer for Neverwinter. He rejoined the podcast to tell us about Neverwinter: Strongholds. This seventh expansion of the game—announced for this summer—will see players join with their guild to claim an abandoned keep from the wild and build it back into its former glory on the largest map in Neverwinter.

Find out more at playneverwinter.com.

Subscribe to the D&D Podcast on iTunes.

Publication date: 06/26/2015Introduction: After an overdue introduction of D&D’s Greg Tito, we revisit the Neverwinter MMO and discuss the coming Strongholds expansion!Tags: Podcastexternal_urls:  External url: http://media.wizards.com/2015/podcasts/dnd/DnDPodcast_06_26_2015.mp3External url description: Strongholds Podcast Texture banner: HideBanner video: 

Homecoming for R.A. Salvatore

Tue, 06/23/2015 - 11:00
Type: NewsAuthor: D&D TeamSubtitle: The New York Times best-selling author hits the road this fall!Banner: Thumbnail (869x490): Text: In-Person Appearances

Wichita, KS – Monday, August 31
Watermark Books & Cafe, 6 pm
4701 East Douglas
Wichita, KS 67218
watermarkbooks.com

St. Louis, MO – Tuesday, September 1
Left Bank Books @ Webster Groves Public Library, 7 pm
301 E Lockwood Ave
St Louis, MO 63119
left-bank.com

Indianapolis, IN – Wednesday, September 2
U-Indy, 7:30 pm
Schwitzer Student Center, Room 010
1400 E Hanna Avenue
Indianapolis, IN 46227
bkstr.com/indianapolisstore/home

Cincinnati, OH – Thursday, September 3
Joseph-Beth Books, 7 pm
2692 Madison Road
Cincinnati, OH 45208
josephbeth.com

Cambridge, MA – Tuesday, September 8
MIT Coop at Kendall Square Bookstore, 5 pm
3 Cambridge Center
Cambridge, MA 02142
mitcoopbooks.bncollege.com

Hartford, CT – Wednesday, September 9
Mark Twain House, 7:30 pm
351 Farmington Avenue
Hartford, CT 06105
marktwainhouse.org

Concord, NH – Thursday, September 10
Gibson’s Bookstore, 7 pm
45 South Main St
Concord, NH 03301
gibsonsbookstore.com

Burlington, MA – Friday, September 11
Barnes & Noble Burlington, 7 pm
98 Middlesex Pkwy
Burlington, MA 01803
barnesandnoble.com

Boston, MA – Saturday, September 12
Boston Public Library, 2 pm
Central Library, Copley Square
Commonwealth Salon
700 Boylston Street
Boston, MA 02116
bpl.org

Chicago, IL – Monday, September 14
DePaul University Bookstore, 6 pm
1 East Jackson Boulevard
Chicago, IL 60614
depaul-lincolnpark.bncollege.com

Denver, CO – Tuesday, September 15
Tattered Cover Bookstore, 7 pm
2526 E. Colfax Avenue
Denver, CO 80206
tatteredcover.com

Spokane WA – Wednesday, September 16
Auntie’s Bookstore, 7 pm
402 W Main
Spokane, WA 99201
auntiesbooks.com

Tacoma, WA – Thursday, September 17
Fort Lewis-McChord Army Base, 4 pm
(open only to U.S. Military ID card holders)

San Diego, CA – Friday, September 18
Mysterious Galaxy Books, 7:30 pm
5943 Balboa Avenue, Suite #100
San Diego, CA 92111
mystgalaxy.com

Montclair, CA – Wednesday, September 23
Barnes & Noble Montclair Plaza, 7 pm
5183 Montclair Plaza Ln
Montclair, CA 91763
barnesandnoble.com

Salt Lake City, UT – Friday, September 25 and Saturday, September 26
Salt Lake City Comic-Con
Salt Palace Convention Center
100 S. West Temple
Salt Lake City, UT 84101
saltlakecomiccon.com

North Haven, CT – Saturday, October 10
Connecticut Renaissance Faire, 1 pm
300 Washington Ave
North Haven, CT 06473
ctfaire.com

Fitchburg, MA – Thursday, October 22
Fitchburg Public Library, 6:30pm
610 Main Street
Fitchburg, MA 01420
fitchburgpubliclibrary.org



Online Appearances

Kill Pop Culture – Wednesday, August 26
killpopculture.podomatic.com

Reddit Ask Me Anything – Thursday, August 27
reddit.com/r/AMA/
8 pm EST

Dungeons & Dragons Podcast – Friday, September 4
DungeonsandDragons.com

The Grim Tidings Podcast – Saturday, September 12
stitcher.com/podcast/the-grim-tidings-podcast

Dungeon Crawlers Radio – Thursday, October 1
DungeonCrawlersRadio.com
8 pm EST

Can’t be there in person? Reserve your signed copy at rasalvatore.com.

Publication date: 06/23/2015Introduction: Meet the New York Times best-selling author during his 2015 tour for the release of Archmage, Book I in the Homecoming series.Tags: Newsexternal_urls: Texture banner: HideBanner video: 

Painting the Myrmidons, Part 2

Mon, 06/22/2015 - 18:15
Type: FeaturesAuthor: Daniel GelonSubtitle: Bringing Elemental Evil to LifeBanner: Thumbnail (869x490): Text: 

Art Director Daniel Gelon details the next stage in the Earth Myrmidon painting process. In this segment, Daniel dry brushes the body of the myrmidons and offers more great tips and tricks for those who wish to try this at home.

 

video-sundering

Painting the Myrmidons: Part 2


Publication date: 06/24/2015Introduction: Daniel Gelon continues the painting process of Gale Force Nine’s earth myrmidon.Tags: FeaturesRelated content: Elemental Evilexternal_urls: Texture banner: ShowBanner video: 

Behind the Screens

Mon, 06/22/2015 - 11:56
Type: FeaturesAuthor: J.M.Subtitle: First-Time Dungeon MasterBanner: Thumbnail (869x490): Text: 

I’m a relatively new D&D player, but I’ve thought about becoming a DM for a long time. I’ve been collecting AD&D adventures since my late teens, but before the prevalence of Google, I wasn’t sure what to do with them and I was too shy to ask.

Recently, more and more of my friends have shown an interest in learning to play. Like me, they felt intimidated by not knowing the rules or how to roleplay. As a group of relatively shy people, playing with strangers sounded even more intimidating to us. So I decided that, even though I was only a new player myself, I would learn how to be a Dungeon Master.

FIRST ENCOUNTERS

My first order of business was to join an existing game in order to better learn the D&D rules. I went to the Wizards of the Coast website and found a D&D Encounters drop-in night at my neighborhood game store. Joining a game full of strangers can be challenging for a shy person, but it was worth it! The group was very friendly and welcoming, both to me and my elf miniatures. The other players happily explained the rules along the way as we embarked on a series of weekly two-hour adventures. I made some new friends, and after a few games, I began to understand the game mechanics and turn actions.

I also started watching games on the Wizards of the Coast D&D YouTube channel to get a better idea of different DM styles. The internet has been a great resource for finding DM tips for new players. I’ve also gotten a lot of tips from seeking out other Dungeon Masters and asking them how they run their games.

ROLLING INITIATIVE

Once I felt comfortable, I set up my first game night with my group. I started with my favorite Wizards of the Coast board game—Dungeon!—which feels to me like D&D for people who have never played before. This game is a great introduction to the mechanics of dice rolling, action and turn order, and the concepts of hit points and armor class. Fighters in the game have a relatively low armor class, so they don’t stand much of a chance against higher-level monsters, but they need the least amount of loot to win. Wizards can teleport and challenge higher-level monsters, but they need to collect more treasure to win. I also saw the game as a low-risk way for my shyer friends to begin to imagine themselves as their characters without being expected to “perform.”

After that first session, we met the following week to play The Lost Mine of Phandelver adventure from the D&D Starter Set. There was some uncertainty at first. What was roleplaying like? How did the rules work? I presented my friends with the pregenerated character sheets, a full set of miniatures, forest images of the Forgotten Realms, forest tiles, and fantasy soundtrack music. I wanted the experience to be visually appealing and immersive. After picking our characters, I had everyone introduce themselves and decide how their backstories were connected. Then we got started on our adventure. It was thrilling to lead my friends through a dungeon crawl in a goblin-infested cave and watch them defeat a goblin boss.

REWARDS AND DEVELOPMENTS

One trick I learned from D&D Encounters nights is to end the session just after a new adventure hook has been set up, to bait the players for the next week’s game. I also learned the importance of encouraging shyer players to take risks in their decision-making. I think D&D is a great venue for players to take initiative, pursue leadership roles, and take risks to achieve goals they might shy away from in real life. This sense of accomplishment could influence the way they feel in their everyday lives.

My first game as DM left me with the impression that I would need to prepare more in the future. It would have been a lot easier to run the game if I had know the adventure hooks and characters a little better in advance. It wasn’t a perfect game, but it was much more accessible to the players than I had imagined. My biggest takeaway from the experience was to just keep working at it, and to not feel intimidated by my status as a new player and DM. I wasn't the perfect Dungeon Master on my first try, but I'm still working at it. Thankfully, my friends are eager to explore the creative possibilities D&D has to offer, and another night of high-fantasy adventure is on the horizon.

About the Author

J.M. works in video production at Wizards of the Coast. Her D&D adventures are inspired by the art of Dave Trampier and heavily art directed on a miniature scale. Her passions are making animations, encouraging female gamers, and media literacy.

Publication date: 06/29/2015Introduction: Running a D&D game had always sounded daunting to me. “Not just anyone can be a DM,” I had heard. “It takes a lot of preparation and experience.” Tags: Behind the Screensexternal_urls: Texture banner: ShowBanner video: 

Happy Father's Day!

Fri, 06/19/2015 - 11:00
Type: FeaturesAuthor: Shelly MazzanobleSubtitle: Celebrating D&D StyleBanner: Thumbnail (869x490): Text: 

Dear old dad. Heroic slayer of under-bed lurking monsters, giver (and sometimes) taker of treasure. Whether he’s a father or father figure, show the man in your life how much he means to you with this special card.

Thank you to all the dads out there and enjoy your special day!

Artist: Emi Tanji

Publication date: 06/19/2015Introduction: We Gnoll the Perfect Way to Say “Thanks, Dad!”Tags: Featuresexternal_urls:  External url: http://media.wizards.com/2015/downloads/dnd/060215_DnD_FathersDay.pdfExternal url description: Download the Card Texture banner: HideBanner video: 

The Return of Elemental Evil

Fri, 06/19/2015 - 11:00
Type: FeaturesAuthor: Shannon AppelclineSubtitle: D&D AlumniBanner: Thumbnail (869x490): Text: 

Appearing in the Princes of the Apocalypse adventure and a new Temple of Elemental Evil board game (not to mention our most recent walkthrough map), Elemental Evil is the heart of D&D’s newest storyline. Its origins go back to some of the earliest D&D lore—most of it focusing on a ruined temple and a small village that had the misfortune to lie near it.

The Origins of the Temple: 1979–1986

At GenCon XII in 1979, TSR released a 16-page Greyhawk adventure called The Village of Hommlet. Written by Gary Gygax, the adventure was a milestone for D&D, marking TSR’s first in-depth depiction of a fully stocked village that adventurers could explore and use as a base of operations. However, Hommlet wasn’t all about talking to farmers and weavers. There was also adventure to be found in a moathouse at the edge of town—and hints of even greater challenges to come.

The moathouse was an outpost for a nearby Temple of Elemental Evil—a “walled fortress” that had long before been sealed by the forces of good fighting the machinations of a “terrible demon.” Many of the nonplayer characters in The Village of Hommlet had their own interests in the temple—for good or ill—and the adventure’s status as a lead-in to further adventures at the temple can be seen in its module code of T1. For more information, DMs were directed to a soon-to-appear follow-up module coded T2, The Temple of Elemental Evil.

As one of the earliest D&D adventures, The Village of Hommlet was published with a monochrome cover. Two years later in 1981, TSR showed its continued commitment to the series by upgrading the original to a full-color cover. However, the follow-up adventure still hadn’t appeared. The problem had previously been discussed in Dragon 35 (March 1980). There, Gygax talked about how his administrative duties at TSR were keeping him from game design. Over the next few years, he would report on more than one occasion that work on T2 was beginning again, but the long-awaited temple adventure never appeared.

In Dragon 90 (October 1984), Gygax finally admitted that he was too busy to finish the adventure. He had thus turned over his three hundred manuscript pages to Frank Mentzer. The result appeared the following August under the module code T1–4. Credited to “Gary Gygax with Frank Mentzer,” The Temple of Elemental Evil was more than just a 16- or 32-page supplement to The Village of Hommlet. Instead, it was a 128-page super-adventure split into four parts. These depicted the original village of Hommlet and its moathouse (a reprint of the original T1 adventure); the nearby village of Nulb and the ruins of the Temple of Elemental Evil; the dungeons beneath the temple; and a series of elemental demiplanes called the “nodes of elemental evil.” Six years after it was first mentioned, the Temple of Elemental Evil was finally complete and available for play.

In the following year, TSR published two more Greyhawk super-adventures: Scourge of the Slave Lords (reprinting the four adventures of the slaver-themed A-series of adventures, and branded as A1–4) and Queen of the Spiders (combining the classic G-series giant adventures, the D-series drow adventures, and the Queen of the Demonweb Pits adventure to be branded GDQ1–7). The three Greyhawk super-adventures were arranged to make it possible to play one after the other—allowing heroes who began their adventuring careers in the village of Hommlet to eventually end up in the Demonweb Pits of the Abyss. Though the origin story of Elemental Evil began small in the village of Hommlet, it ended big as part of one of D&D’s first great adventure paths (the other being the Dragonlance adventures, which also concluded in 1986).



Return to the Temple: 1999–2013

For many years, it seemed as if the stories of Elemental Evil and its temple were done. Though Temple of Elemental Evil was fondly remembered as one of the classic D&D adventures, the game moved on to other tales and other worlds.

That changed in 1999, when Wizards of the Coast started publishing nostalgic returns to the past as part of D&D’s silver anniversary. Against the Giants: The Liberation of Geoff (1999) and Slavers (2000) revisited the classic giants and slavers adventures, as part of a series of a half-dozen adventures that returned to D&D’s old stomping grounds. From 1999 to 2002, a complementary series of Greyhawk Classics novels also appeared.

Elemental Evil finally got its own moment in the nostalgic spotlight in 2001. The Greyhawk Classic novel The Temple of Elemental Evil provided a narrative interpretation of the original adventure, something that was mirrored two years later by the Atari video game The Temple of Elemental Evil: A Classic Greyhawk Adventure. In addition, between these two publications, the temple enjoyed something new: a full sequel to the 1985 adventure.

Return to the Temple of Elemental Evil by Monte Cook appeared in 2001, following up on the events in Gygax and Mentzer’s super-adventure fifteen years later. New players had a chance to visit Hommlet (grown to a large town) and the now-deserted ruins of Nulb. In the process, they learned that evil forces had once more come to haunt the area. Eventually, characters would delve through the ruined remains of the original Temple of Elemental Evil, as well as the new Temple of All-Consumption. In both those ancient lairs, the adventurers learned of even deeper secrets than the ones uncovered by other adventurers a generation before. Like its predecessor, Return to the Temple of Elemental Evil is a classic-style dungeon crawl—and one deeply steeped in Greyhawk lore.

After the publication of Cook’s new megadungeon, Elemental Evil was once more lost to nostalgia. It made some brief returns during the days of fourth edition D&D, but only on a small scale. The Village of Hommlet was updated to fourth edition rules in 2009 by Andy Collins, and released through the RPGA DM Rewards program. Meanwhile, fans of the elements could play The Elder Elemental Eye as the eighth season of D&D Encounters in 2012. It wasn’t exactly Elemental Evil, but it focused on one of the many gods associated with the temple, and tied in with the Heroes of the Elemental Chaos supplement.

Fans of Elemental Evil during the 4e era were probably most interested in Dragon 425 (July 2013). That issue included an extensive historical look at the temple, as well as some discussion of what exactly Elemental Evil was. This was, in fact, a longstanding question, since Elemental Evil had been presented in some confusing ways during its earliest incarnations.



The Gods of the Temple

The story of the Temple of Elemental Evil changed a lot over the years, and those changes have been reflected through the many different gods who have been associated with the temple at different times.

When Gary Gygax first sketched out plans for the temple in The Village of Hommlet, he intended that the spider goddess Lolth would be the temple’s main villain. However, when Lolth became the antagonist of David C. Sutherland III’s Queen of the Demonweb Pits, she was removed from consideration for the temple. Gygax thus considered the single Lolth reference in The Village of Hommlet to be a mistake, and the spider goddess probably should have been expunged from the completed Temple of Elemental Evil. Instead, she remains as a very weak (almost nonexistent) faction within the temple.

Gygax also intended to hide a secret shrine to the Elder Elemental God deep beneath the modern temple—with the god’s power being used and abused by Lolth. This would have more fully explained the presence of Elemental Evil within the temple, but the idea was dropped when Frank Mentzer took over the design of the super-adventure. Ironically, the Elder Elemental God also disappeared from the GDQ series after passing mentions in the giants and drow adventures, when David Sutherland completed that extended series with Queen of the Demonweb Pits.

By the time Mentzer was given Gygax’s notes, the fungus goddess Zuggtmoy had taken over the role of temple villain. Her connection to the elements seemed spurious, but Mentzer explained it as a ruse on the goddess’s part, saying that “Elemental Evil would have more appeal than a cult dedicated to her beloved fungi.” Mentzer also added the cambion Iuz to the mix as another god who contributed to the creation of the temple. Though they didn’t have elemental connections, Iuz and Zuggtmoy did have one advantage over Lolth and the Elder Elemental God: they were more deeply ingrained into the Greyhawk setting.

Over the years, many players found Zuggtmoy at the heart of the Temple of Elemental Evil and were somewhat puzzled by her fungoid presence. Monte Cook finally offered a new explanation a decade and a half later in Return to the Temple of Elemental Evil. He did so by bringing in Tharizdun, a nihilistic god of entropy that Gygax had created for The Forgotten Temple of Tharizdun (1982). Cook explained that Tharizdun had always been the true core of the temple, and that he’d manipulated Zuggtmoy and Iuz into doing his bidding. He also revealed that Tharizdun had another aspect: he was sometimes known as the Elder Elemental Eye.

The revelation that the Elder Elemental God was an aspect of Tharizdun met with mixed reactions among Greyhawk fans. However, that result was actually quite close to Gygax’s first conception of the temple. Originally, an aspect of the Elder Elemental God had been another layer of secrecy hidden beneath Zuggtmoy’s power, providing a more solid association with Elemental Evil.

Cook also introduced another god to his revamped temple: Imix, the Prince of Evil Fire Elementals. He was one of the Elemental Princes of Evil, first published in the Fiend Folio (1981). The inclusion of one of their number in the temple was another nice tie to D&D’s elemental heritage.

Fourteen years after the game’s last major incursion into Gygax’s fabled temple, Elemental Evil is back. What new secrets will be revealed? DMs and players delving into Princes of the Apocalypse will know the answers soon enough.



About the Author

Shannon Appelcline has been roleplaying since his dad taught him Basic D&D in the early ’80s. He’s the editor-in-chief of RPGnet and the author of Designers & Dragons, a four-volume history of the roleplaying industry told one company at a time.

Publication date: 06/19/2015Introduction: Elemental Evil makes a big return this year, building on its long history as part of the Dungeons & Dragons game.Tags: D&D Alumniexternal_urls: Texture banner: HideBanner video: 

Sage Advice

Thu, 06/18/2015 - 13:21
Type: FeaturesAuthor: Jeremy CrawfordSubtitle: Rules RoundupBanner: Thumbnail (869x490): Text: 

Following the release of corrections for the fifth edition Player’s Handbook on June 10, this installment of Sage Advice presents several reference documents for the game, in the interest of giving D&D groups new tools for making the game work for them.

Next month, we’ll get back to our regular questions and answers, and we’ll begin compiling my most relevant rules answers from Twitter. If you have questions for a future installment of Sage Advice, please send them to sageadvice@wizards.com.

Sage Advice Compendium

Ever since Sage Advice started in January, we’ve received requests to gather it in one place. We’ve listened and created the following PDF to make it easier for you to find answers to your questions:

Sage Advice Compendium (version 1.0)

The PDF not only collects Sage Advice questions to date, but also lists the sources of the game’s official rules. Even better, we’ll expand that document every time we publish Sage Advice (the questions at the end of this column are also included). The PDF will effectively become the FAQ for the game.

Spell Lists

The Player’s Handbook gives you the spell lists of every spellcasting class, but sometimes you might want to find a spell using other criteria. This new PDF lets you find every ritual in one place, as well as look up spells by school of magic or by spell level:

D&D Spell Lists (version 1.0)

The PDF also includes new versions of the class spell lists, which tell you each spell’s school of magic and whether a spell is a ritual.

This resource will be helpful for many of you, particularly those of you playing fighters who have the Eldritch Knight archetype, rogues who have the Arcane Trickster archetype, and warlocks who have the Pact of the Tome feature.

Player’s Handbook Errata

Here’s a link to the latest version of the Player’s Handbook errata document:

Player’s Handbook Errata (version 1.1)

The eagle-eyed Sam Simpson, a member of our customer service team, noticed that the document released on June 10 missed a few details that appear in the third printing of the Player’s Handbook. As a result, we’ve updated the document to version 1.1 to be truly comprehensive. Here’s a list of the parts that have changed since version 1.0:

  • Ranger’s Companion (The document now clarifies that the beast can spend Hit Dice during a short rest.)
  • Wild Magic Surge (A surge can happen once per turn.)
  • Pact of the Tome (The chosen cantrips needn’t be from the same spell list.)
  • Suffocating (The words “or are choking” now appear in the first sentence.)
Errata-Related Questions

Why does the Player’s Handbook errata change X and not Y?
The errata for the first printing of the Player’s Handbook sparked a number of questions. Why did we make the changes we made? Why didn’t we make other changes? Did we change certain things, such as Empowered Evocation, because they were overpowered?

The answer to such questions is straightforward: we fixed mistakes in the text. The errata fixes text that was incomplete or off the mark in the original printing of the book. In the new edition, the errata process is strictly for the correction of such things. Rebalancing and redesigning game elements is the domain of playtesting, Unearthed Arcana articles, new design, and possible revision later in the edition’s lifespan.

We play the game often, and we regularly review Twitter posts, Reddit discussions, website forums, survey results, emails, and customer service reports about the game. You have concerns about the contagion spell? We know about them. You feel the Beastmaster is underpowered? We’ve had our eye on that subclass for a while. In fact, we have a long list of things in the game that we keep an eye on and that we expect to experiment with in the months and years ahead.

But that experimentation is unrelated to errata. Corrections—that’s what errata is about. If you read the errata document and think, “We were already playing Empowered Evocation the way it appears in the errata,” then the errata process is working as intended. It’s not intended to be filled with new design surprises. It’s meant to repair spots where we forgot to tell you something, where we inadvertently told you the wrong thing, or where some of you grasped our design intent and others didn’t, as a result of the text not being clear enough.

Some monsters have resistance or immunity to damage from nonmagical weapons. How is that affected by the change to unarmed strikes in the PH errata?
The change to unarmed strikes is related to a correction coming in the Monster Manual. As corrected, unarmed strikes aren’t weapons, but a character can use them to make melee weapon attacks. Such strikes aren’t meant to bypass a creature’s resistance or immunity to bludgeoning damage from nonmagical weapons.

Here’s a simple fix to use until the Monster Manual errata is released: whenever a stat block refers to resistance or immunity to bludgeoning damage from nonmagical weapons, read that last part as “nonmagical weapon attacks.”

About the Author

Jeremy Crawford is the co-lead designer of fifth edition Dungeons & Dragons, as well as the game’s managing editor. He was the lead designer of the new Player’s Handbook and one of the leads on the Dungeon Master’s Guide. He has worked on many other D&D books since coming to Wizards of the Coast in 2007. You can reach him on Twitter (@JeremyECrawford).

Publication date: 06/22/2015Introduction: Like any heavily used system, the D&D rules undergo ongoing analysis, and occasionally, we like to pause and provide new resources for their current state.Tags: Sage AdviceRelated content: TRPG_DMGTRPG_PHBexternal_urls:  External url: http://media.wizards.com/2015/downloads/dnd/SA_Compendium_1.0.pdfExternal url description: Sage Advice Compendium 1.0 External url: http://media.wizards.com/2015/downloads/dnd/PH_Errata_1.1.pdfExternal url description: Player's Handbook Errata External url: http://media.wizards.com/2015/downloads/dnd/DnD_SpellLists_1.0.pdfExternal url description: D&D Spell Lists 1.0 Texture banner: ShowBanner video: 

Dragon+ Issue 2

Fri, 06/12/2015 - 13:19
Description: Dragon+ is your official mobile source for all-things Dungeons & Dragons. This free app for Android or iOS has everything you want to know about D&D in one easy place.Picture: Type: WallpapersDisplay Mode thumbnail: LargeTitle: Dragon+ Issue 2Image : 

Dragon Plus Launches New Issue

Thu, 06/11/2015 - 19:15
Type: NewsAuthor: Greg TitoSubtitle: Walk Through D&D Video Game HistoryBanner: Thumbnail (869x490): Text: 

Since the new Dragon+ app launched in the App Store and on Google Play in April, the free all-in-one Dungeons & Dragons companion has delighted players and newcomers alike. Starting today, D&D fans can continue the adventure with the release of issue #2.

Dragon+, Issue #2

Issue #2 highlights the legacy of Dungeons & Dragons in the world of video games, including new details from n-Space on the world and heroes in the upcoming RPG Sword Coast Legends and pre-generated character sheets based on the companions players will recruit in the single player campaign. Readers can also get a preview of Spellstorm, a new novel from Ed Greenwood, the creator of the Forgotten Realms setting, as well as updates on the D&D Adventurers League, a short story set in Icewind Dale and Heroes of Hesiod, a tabletop adventure for kids.

About the Cover & Artist

For the cover of the second issue of Dragon+, Wizards of the Coast is thrilled to present an interpretation of the iconic D&D ampersand from the artist known as Hydro74. Based in Orlando, FL, Hydro74 (Joshua Smith) has pushed boundaries in ornate yet visceral representations of brands like Nike, Disney and Harley Davidson. Smith was especially interested in working with Dungeon & Dragons because of the very personal connection he had with the game.

Here’s what Smith had to say about his own experience with Dungeons & Dragons:

“There was a beauty in a simple roll of the dice, allowing thoughts to give birth to greater ideas and finding yourself building something you wish you were in reality,” said Smith. “Being a child of dysfunction, abuse and foster care, Dungeons & Dragons allowed for the child to find his path to manhood in simple forms. The simple poetry of talking about our characters and who we wish we could be made life as a child feel innocent and perfect.

“I never expected to be part of Dungeons & Dragons because it holds a legacy few companies can say they have,” Smith continued. “To get emails from creative directors at Wizards of the Coast with this mutual passion for each other’s work and involvement speaks volumes. So, thank you. It means the world for me to be involved and to be part of the family.”

Dragon+ is currently available for free on the iTunes App Store and Google Play. Smiths’ interpretation of the D&D ampersand can be found below my signature on the new Dragon+ cover and is available for pre-order now on a t-shirt at WeLoveFine.

Publication date: 06/11/2015Introduction: The wait is over, the newest issue of Dragon+ drops today!Tags: NewsRelated content: Sword Coast Legendsexternal_urls: Texture banner: ShowBanner video: 

Dragon+ Launches New Issue

Thu, 06/11/2015 - 16:07
Type: NewsAuthor: D&D TeamSubtitle: Walk through D&D video game historyBanner: Thumbnail (869x490): Text: 

Since the new Dragon+ app launched in the App Store and on Google Play in April, the free all-in-one Dungeons & Dragons companion has delighted players and newcomers alike. Starting today, D&D fans can continue the adventure with the release of issue #2.

Dragon+, Issue #2

Issue #2 highlights the legacy of Dungeons & Dragons in the world of video games, including new details from n-Space on the world and heroes in the upcoming RPG Sword Coast Legends and pre-generated character sheets based on the companions players will recruit in the single player campaign. Readers can also get a preview of Spellstorm, a new novel from Ed Greenwood, the creator of the Forgotten Realms setting, as well as updates on the D&D Adventurers League, a short story set in Icewind Dale and Heroes of Hesiod, a tabletop adventure for kids.

About the Cover & Artist

For the cover of the second issue of Dragon+, Wizards of the Coast is thrilled to present an interpretation of the iconic D&D ampersand from the artist known as Hydro74. Based in Orlando, FL, Hydro74 (Joshua Smith) has pushed boundaries in ornate yet visceral representations of brands like Nike, Disney and Harley Davidson. Smith was especially interested in working with Dungeon & Dragons because of the very personal connection he had with the game.

Here’s what Smith had to say about his own experience with Dungeons & Dragons:

“There was a beauty in a simple roll of the dice, allowing thoughts to give birth to greater ideas and finding yourself building something you wish you were in reality,” said Smith. “Being a child of dysfunction, abuse and foster care, Dungeons & Dragons allowed for the child to find his path to manhood in simple forms. The simple poetry of talking about our characters and who we wish we could be made life as a child feel innocent and perfect.

“I never expected to be part of Dungeons & Dragons because it holds a legacy few companies can say they have,” Smith continued. “To get emails from creative directors at Wizards of the Coast with this mutual passion for each other’s work and involvement speaks volumes. So, thank you. It means the world for me to be involved and to be part of the family.”

Dragon+ is currently available for free on the iTunes App Store and Google Play.   Smiths’ interpretation of the D&D ampersand can be found below my signature on the new Dragon+ cover and is available for pre-order now on a t-shirt at WeLoveFine.

Publication date: 06/11/2015Introduction: The wait is over, the newest issue of Dragon+ drops today! Tags: Newsexternal_urls: Texture banner: ShowBanner video: 

Monster Slayers: Champions of the Elements

Thu, 06/11/2015 - 11:00
Type: FeaturesAuthor: Susan J. MorrisSubtitle: D&D for KidsBanner: Thumbnail (869x490): Text: 



Everyone remembers the time they first discovered D&D. It probably made a lasting impression on you, right? I mean, you’re here, reading this article. Wouldn’t it be nice to share that experience with the young person in your life?

Maybe you’re a parent who wants to share the fun of Dungeons & Dragons with your kids, but worried the rules are too complicated or their attention spans are too short. Are you a teacher or librarian who would like to introduce your students to the game, but you’re reluctant to take on the regular time commitment of a full-blown campaign?

There are a great many reasons to share D&D with kids. Besides being just the kind of imaginative play that kids naturally engage in, Dungeons & Dragons develops an array of essential educational skills, including:

  • Math skills
  • Reading skills
  • Writing skills
  • Cooperation and leadership
  • Problem-solving
  • Creative thinking

Over the years, we’ve heard from many of you out there that you want to unlock these benefits for your kids, but you feel that they’re not ready for the basic game or you just don’t have the time to run your own campaign.

Following in the footsteps of the highly acclaimed Monster Slayers: The Heroes of Hesiod, by Susan J. Morris, Monster Slayers: The Champions of the Elements captures the flavor of the Dungeons & Dragons tabletop roleplaying game in one fast-paced, action-packed package for kids who want to learn the fundamentals of the game. It’s also a fun diversion for experienced players who need their D&D fix, but don’t have the time for a full-length game.

The Champions of the Elements requires no previous knowledge of Dungeons & Dragons, and all you need to play is included in this adventure, aside from a few dice, pencils, and some future roleplayers to play it with. Just think, three decades from now they could be reminiscing about their cool aunt, cousin, older brother, parent who introduced them to the hobby that has helped shape the person they have become. (No pressure.)

Note: You can also find the original Monster Slayers: Heroes of Hesiod adventure activity at DNDClassics.com!

Publication date: 06/10/2015Introduction: It’s never too soon to roleplay!Tags: FeaturesRelated content: TRPG_DMGTRPG_PHBexternal_urls:  External url: http://media.wizards.com/2015/downloads/dnd/MonsterSlayers_v3.pdfExternal url description: Monster Slayers: Champions of the Elements Texture banner: HideBanner video: 

Painting the Myrmidons

Thu, 06/11/2015 - 11:00
Type: FeaturesAuthor: Daniel GelonSubtitle: Bringing Elemental Evil to LifeBanner: Thumbnail (869x490): Text: 

The elemental myrmidon miniatures all represent elementals wearing heavy armor, based on illustrations by Filip Burburan that I had the pleasure of art directing. Since I have a connection to these creatures, I want to keep the color themes close to those in the original painting. The earth myrmidon seems like it’ll be the easiest, so I’ll start with that.

Earth Myrmidon Part 2: Dry Brushing

Art Director Daniel Gelon details the next stage in the Earth Myrmidon painting process. In this segment, Daniel dry brushes the body of the myrmidons and offers more great tips and tricks for those who wish to try this at home.

 

video-sundering

Painting the Myrmidons: Part 2


Earth Myrmidon Part 1: Preparation

I’m going to explore the process of painting the elemental myrmidon miniatures over the course of a number of articles. In this installment, I’ll talk about the all-important preparations for painting.

 

video-sundering

Painting the Myrmidons: Part 1


Prepping the Miniature

The earth myrmidon comes in five parts, all cast in resin—base, stone on base, body, right arm, and hands holding a club. Before painting can start, the model has to be prepped and assembled, and the first step is to remove the sprues. Mold making has a few technical terms—sprue, runner, and gates—to describe the channels in the molds where resin is poured in to form the model. I’m using the term “sprue” to describe the excess resin that is not part of the finished model. On this model, the sprues all look like cylinders attached to the pieces.



Dremel tools, a retractable blade, files, and sandpaper are all common tools used to remove excess resin. The Dremel is a miniature-sized power drill used in hobbies. Mine is cordless and rechargeable, with a pistol grip and (most importantly) variable speeds. With a cutting wheel attached and using a low speed (so as to not melt the resin), I begin trimming off the sprues, usually leaving a little stump about a millimeter or two high. If the surface is going to be hidden, I might just cut a sprue all the way down with the Dremel. That way, if I have an accident and score the resin, it’s not in a critical or visible location. This process kicks up a surprising amount of resin dust, so it needs to be done in a well-ventilated area. Always use a filter mask and safety glasses.



I continue this process for all the pieces.



The next step is to remove those little nubs. Some resins are very hard, and require metal files to remove them. The Gale Force Nine resin is a joy to work with and very easy to carve. I can use a retractable hobby blade to scrape the nubs off in several passes.



After all the excess sprue resin is removed, the next step is assembling the parts. Sometimes there are seam lines left behind from the molding process that have to be scraped off or cleaned up as well, but these castings are incredibly clean and ready to go.

Assembling the Miniature (Sub Assemblies and Pinning)

When painting, the goal is to have all the model’s areas as accessible to the brush as possible, so a little thinking needs to happen at this stage about how to make the job easier. When I test fit the mini, I feel that if I leave the hands and the right arm off—painting them separately and attaching them at the end—I’ll have a much easier time reaching the armor on the inside of the myrmidon’s arms and around his head. The mini is designed extremely well and there are natural separations between the stone and the armor, so I won’t have to worry about puttying or painting over seams. I hate using putty (though I already know I’m going to have to when I paint the air myrmidon after the earth myrmidon is done).

Before I glue the parts together, I’m going to pin them. Pinning is the process of drilling little holes in the parts and connecting them with metal posts or pins. I’m going to use sections of paper clips as my pins. The model already has posts and holes that lock together, but pinning strengthens the joints. I pin around 80 percent of my model parts, even ones with resin posts and holes. If a model is handled a lot—and especially if it’s accidentally dropped—those connection points can break. Pinning doesn’t take that much time, and it gives me some extra insurance that those pieces aren’t going to break off. To pin, I need a mechanical pencil, a rubber band to hold pieces together, some paper clips, a pin vise (which is a tiny handheld drill), and of course, the Dremel.



With the mechanical pencil, I mark an “X” from corner to corner on the tops of the posts and in the base of the holes on the arm and hand connection points. I choose a drill bit smaller than the diameter of the paper clip post, then drill little pilot holes in the center of the X’s with the pin vise. I could drill these holes to the correct depth with the pin vise, but it’s very slow going and a pain to use (pushing and twisting by hand). Unless the part is extremely thin or delicate, I prefer to switch over to the Dremel once the pilot holes are drilled.



In the Dremel, I place a bit that is just slightly larger than the paper clip. I want a little wiggle room if the holes aren’t perfectly aligned, and I want some space for the glue in the hole as well.

With the base and the body, I’m going to do something a little different. I wrap a rubber band around the parts to keep them steady. Then, bearing in mind the angle of the legs, I drill through the bottom of the base and deep into the legs to get a long, perfectly straight pin placement.

I now have all the holes drilled, but I’m not ready to glue the pins in and assemble the models just yet. First the pieces need a bath! When the resin is poured into the mold, the mold is coated in a mold release so that the parts don’t stick to the mold. This mold release might stop paints and primers from sticking to the parts, so the pieces need a little soaking in soapy warm water. I use just a bit of regular liquid dish soap. The pieces are then rinsed off with clean water before scrubbing them with a soft brush. (I use a funky wide toothbrush that I found at the local drug store.) After shaking off most of the water, the pieces are left to dry.



I cut the pins with some snips, making sure they’re not too long for the holes. On the arm and hand pieces, I don’t snip the pins because I’m going to place them into corks that I use as painting stands.



Now I’m ready to glue the pieces together. I use a type of fast-acting cyanoacrylate glue—the kind of glue most people know as Krazy Glue or Super Glue. However, the glue I use has micro particles of rubber in it. Krazy Glue and Super Glue have a tendency to get brittle with time, and dropping a miniature will often break a glue bond. The little rubber particles add a bit of shock absorption. I glue the surfaces and the pin holes. I then add the pins and hold the parts together for several seconds until the glue bonds.





With everything glued, I’m almost ready for priming. However, because I want the best bond I can get when I eventually glue the arms and hand to the body, I want to stick the body onto a stand so I don’t have to touch the mini and get finger oils on it while painting. Poster putty to the rescue.



First, I stick the body to an old tub of paint, covering the posts and holes where I’ll want to glue parts together later on.





Finally, the parts are ready for priming!



Priming the Miniature

There are many different primers on the market. Some painters swear by certain brands, but I find that they all work equally well. The main distinction I make is whether the primer is light or dark. Dark primer tends to mute color painted over it, while light primer tends to brighten colors painted over it. I know I want deep earth tones and metals as well as black recesses on the rocks of the earth myrmidon, so I decide to prime with Citadel’s Chaos Black primer.



I usually prime out of doors (though I occasionally use a spray box). I find that holding the mini allows me to get into the nooks a bit better. Plus, I can prime the front and the back of the mini at the same time. Once again, always use a filter mask when you’re priming. There are a lot of scary-looking warnings on that label.



When the earth myrmidon is primed, it’s finally ready for painting. I’ll talk about that in the next installment.

Publication date: 06/11/2015Introduction: In celebration of the Elemental Evil storyline, I’m going to be painting Gale Force Nine’s earth, air, water, and fire myrmidons. Each of these miniatures is going to offer some unique challenges and employ a variety of techniques.Tags: FeaturesRelated content: Elemental Evilexternal_urls: Texture banner: ShowBanner video: 

Variant Rules

Thu, 06/11/2015 - 11:00
Type: FeaturesAuthor: Mike MearlsSubtitle: Unearthed ArcanaBanner: Thumbnail (869x490): Text: 

Up for discussion are the options of having the players make all the die rolls at the table; using vitality points to better reflect the wear and tear a character suffers during combat; and creating a customized alignment system specific to your campaign. Some of these options should be familiar to players of earlier editions of the D&D game, as they’ve been presented as variants in those prior editions.

You can think of the material presented in this series as similar to the first wave of the fifth edition playtest. These game mechanics are in draft form, usable in your campaign but not fully tempered by playtests and design iterations. They are highly volatile and might be unstable; if you use them, be ready to rule on any issues that come up. They’re written in pencil, not ink. For these reasons, material in this column is not legal in D&D Organized Play events.

The material presented in Unearthed Arcana will range from mechanics that we expect one day to publish in a supplement to house rules from our home campaigns that we want to share, from core system options to setting-specific material. Once it’s out there, you can expect us to check in with you to see how it’s working out and what we can do to improve it.

Publication date: 06/08/2015Introduction: For this month’s Unearthed Arcana, we’re showing off a few variant rules that you can use in your campaigns.Tags: Unearthed ArcanaRelated content: TRPG_DMGexternal_urls:  External url: http://media.wizards.com/2015/downloads/dnd/UA5_VariantRules.pdfExternal url description: UNEARTHED ARCANA: VARIANT RULES Texture banner: HideBanner video: 

My New d20 Modern Campaign Test

Wed, 06/10/2015 - 12:17
Type: FeaturesAuthor: Dan HelmickSubtitle: Behind the ScreensBanner: Thumbnail (869x490): Text: 

When Wizards of the Coast released the d20 Modern roleplaying game in 2002, I was in heaven. Gnolls in crushed velvet! Ogres decked out in London Fog overcoats! Living dumpsters that ate people!



I was crazy about the Urban Arcana campaign setting in particular. The scenario was a familiar one, seemingly plucked from my own daydreams. D&D monsters and magic (called “Shadow” within the setting) are finding their way into our world. The vast majority of humankind remains largely ignorant of this development, thanks to our awesome capacity for denial. Only a small number of humans and friendly Shadowkind races can even perceive—much less combat—the threats that such an incursion brings.

I ran my Urban Arcana campaign for six years. By that point, other games had clamored for my attention, but I never forgot how interested I was in the marriage of D&D to urban fantasy. When the fifth edition Dungeon Master’s Guide was released last December, I knew without a doubt that my first homebrew setting using the new rules would be an updated take on Urban Arcana, adapting firearms and modern armor for use in an urban fantasy game.

Rules of Engagement

The Dungeon Master’s Guide provides optional rules for firearms in D&D—including modern and even futuristic weapons. However, this left me in a quandary regarding character defenses. In a typical fantasy setting, adventurers, guards, and other possible combatants are fully expected to wear armor. There are no social penalties when characters are observed in full armor while going about their business. Modern settings are a different animal in this regard.

Using the old d20 Modern Core Rulebook as a guide, and tweaking the math for fifth edition, I created armor options for my “5e Modern” campaign. Because it can be assumed that most characters operate undercover, incognito, or simply in an unobtrusive manner for at least part of the time, I made sure that those options included concealable armor. More obvious armor—whether riot armor, flak jackets, or Land Warrior milspec armor—will likely have an affect on characters’ social ability checks and their ability to move freely in your campaign. By that same token, armor might afford bonuses to Charisma (Intimidation) checks.

 

Modern Armor

 

 

 

 

 

 

Armor

 

Armor Class (AC)

Strength

Stealth

Properties

Weight

Light Armor

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Heavy coat

11 + Dex modifier

Disadvantage

6 lb.

 

Leather jacket

11 + Dex modifier

4 lb.

 

Light undercover shirt

11 + Dex modifier

DR/2 ballistic

2 lb.

 

Kevlar-lined coat

12 + Dex modifier

DR/2 ballistic

8 lb.

 

Undercover vest

13 + Dex modifier

DR/2 ballistic

3 lb.

Medium Armor

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Concealable vest

13 + Dex modifier (max 2)

DR/3 ballistic

4 lb.

 

Light-duty vest

14 + Dex modifier (max 3)

DR/3 ballistic

8 lb.

 

Tactical vest

15 + Dex modifier (max 2)

Str 10

Disadvantage

Resistance: ballistic

10 lb.

Heavy Armor

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Special response vest

15

Str 10

Disadvantage

Resistance: ballistic

15 lb.

 

Land Warrior armor

17

Str 13

Disadvantage

DR/5 ballistic/slashing

10 lb.

 

Forced entry unit

18

Str 13

Disadvantage

Resistance: ballistic/slashing

20 lb.

 

Publication date: 01/01/2015Introduction: I’m a longtime D&D player, but I’m also a sucker for urban fantasy. With the Dungeon Master’s Guide and some tweaking, I’ve begun to use the fifth edition rules to explore the possibilities of gunplay in a modern fantasy setting.Tags: Featuresexternal_urls: Texture banner: ShowBanner video: 

D&D Errata

Tue, 06/09/2015 - 12:45
Type: FeaturesAuthor: D&D TeamSubtitle: Player's HandbookBanner: Thumbnail (869x490): Text: 

No matter how much orc blood and dragon sweat the team poured into making the fifth edition of D&D, a few errors slipped past us when the Player’s Handbook was published last summer. With the incredibly positive response the new core rules have experienced across the world, we have the opportunity to correct those mistakes in the latest printing. It is normal in publishing to correct typos, omissions, and misstatements in later printings of a book. The corrections in the new printing of the Player’s Handbook are of that sort. We’re very proud of the game as it is. We have merely cut words that shouldn’t be there, added some that should have been there, and clarified some rules.

If you’re interested in checking out what’s changed and have already purchased a copy of the PH, we have prepared a one-page PDF that explains the changes. If you’re familiar with past errata documents for D&D, this one is a bit different. Rather than detail every word that’s changed, the document tells you how a particular rule is supposed to work. This approach is meant to make the document easy to use in play.

The changes represented in the errata document have been integrated into the text of new printings of the Player’s Handbook, as well as into the corresponding sections of the Basic Rules PDF available here.

You can download the errata here:

Publication date: 06/10/2015Introduction: A new printing of the Player’s Handbook corrects some typos while clarifying a few rules.Tags: FeaturesRelated content: TRPG_PHBexternal_urls:  External url: http://media.wizards.com/2015/downloads/dnd/PH_Errata_1.1.pdfExternal url description: Player's Handbook Errata Texture banner: ShowBanner video: 

Sword Coast Legends

Tue, 06/09/2015 - 12:38
Type: FeaturesAuthor: Greg TitoSubtitle: Coming September 8thBanner: Thumbnail (869x490): Text: 

The party-based RPG Sword Coast Legends features a real-time Dungeon Master mode that works seamlessly with players from all platforms.

We’re pretty psyched about Sword Coast Legends. Dungeons & Dragons has a huge influence on all video games, especially fantasy adventures with a party of heroes traipsing around the wilderness, but Sword Coast Legends takes that a step further by allowing a Dungeon Master to craft the experience for his or her party. Today, our partners n-Space and Digital Extremes have sweetened the deal even more by letting console players into the party. Sword Coast Legends is slated to come out on PC, Mac and Linux on September 8th and later on Xbox One and PlayStation 4.

"Getting as many D&D players as possible into our current storyline is always our focus," said Nathan Stewart, brand director of Dungeons & Dragons. "With Sword Coast Legends being available on so many platforms, it doesn't matter if you game on a couch or at a desk—you'll be able to join your friends for some glorious D&D dungeon delves."

It was cool to learn that award-winning composer Inon Zur has signed on to write the game’s soundtrack—you may recognize some of the games he’s worked on like Dragon Age: Origins, Baldur's Gate II: Throne of Bhaal, Icewind Dale II, Fallout 3, and EverQuest. Combine Zur’s evocative music with the release on so many platforms and it’s easy to see why we’re not the only ones who are excited for Sword Coast Legends. The video gaming press really dug everything they saw at the Game Developers Conference in San Francisco this Spring and we can’t wait to show them more at E3 next week.

"After we announced and demonstrated Sword Coast Legends to overwhelmingly positive response at GDC, the press, partners, and fans all requested more," said Dan Tudge, President of n-Space and Director for Sword Coast Legends. “They wanted Mac, so we're doing it. They wanted Linux, so we're doing it. They clamored for console... so we circled back, worked with Unity, and figured out how to do it without compromising our vision for PC gamers. This, in addition to our existing PC, Mac and Linux versions, ensures gamers will be able to have the D&D experience whenever, wherever and however they want."

To tide you over until you start your party’s adventure in Sword Coast Legends, check out this trailer introducing the story, the characters and the new features in the game.

Look for more information and impressions from Sword Coast Legends to drop during E3. The Wizards of the Coast team will be there with n-Space and Digital Extremes to show off everything DM Mode has to offer and we’ll be sure to share pictures of the event on all our social feeds and here at the website. See you in L.A!

Publication date: 06/09/2015Introduction: Play Sword Coast Legends on Consoles, Mac, Linux or Windows with your friends online or in an epic single-player campaign.Tags: FeaturesRelated content: Sword Coast Legendsexternal_urls: Texture banner: HideBanner video: