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Brinebrood Queen

Flickr Dungeons and Dragons Tag Feed - Tue, 06/23/2015 - 17:59

ridureyu1 has added a photo to the pool:

Brinebrood Queen

She's one of the oldest and most powerful Grindylows - her rank is justly deserved!

Categories: Dungeons and Dragons

Andrazku Demon

Flickr Dungeons and Dragons Tag Feed - Tue, 06/23/2015 - 17:59

ridureyu1 has added a photo to the pool:

Andrazku Demon

These savage creatures hate females, and often serve mariliths and succubi to their chagrin.

Categories: Dungeons and Dragons

Homecoming for R.A. Salvatore

Wizards of the Coast D&D - Tue, 06/23/2015 - 11:00
Type: NewsAuthor: D&D TeamSubtitle: The New York Times best-selling author hits the road this fall!Banner: Thumbnail (869x490): Text: In-Person Appearances

Wichita, KS – Monday, August 31
Watermark Books & Cafe, 6 pm
4701 East Douglas
Wichita, KS 67218
watermarkbooks.com

St. Louis, MO – Tuesday, September 1
Left Bank Books @ Webster Groves Public Library, 7 pm
301 E Lockwood Ave
St Louis, MO 63119
left-bank.com

Indianapolis, IN – Wednesday, September 2
U-Indy, 7:30 pm
Schwitzer Student Center, Room 010
1400 E Hanna Avenue
Indianapolis, IN 46227
bkstr.com/indianapolisstore/home

Cincinnati, OH – Thursday, September 3
Joseph-Beth Books, 7 pm
2692 Madison Road
Cincinnati, OH 45208
josephbeth.com

Cambridge, MA – Tuesday, September 8
MIT Coop at Kendall Square Bookstore, 5 pm
3 Cambridge Center
Cambridge, MA 02142
mitcoopbooks.bncollege.com

Hartford, CT – Wednesday, September 9
Mark Twain House, 7:30 pm
351 Farmington Avenue
Hartford, CT 06105
marktwainhouse.org

Concord, NH – Thursday, September 10
Gibson’s Bookstore, 7 pm
45 South Main St
Concord, NH 03301
gibsonsbookstore.com

Burlington, MA – Friday, September 11
Barnes & Noble Burlington, 7 pm
98 Middlesex Pkwy
Burlington, MA 01803
barnesandnoble.com

Boston, MA – Saturday, September 12
Boston Public Library, 2 pm
Central Library, Copley Square
Commonwealth Salon
700 Boylston Street
Boston, MA 02116
bpl.org

Chicago, IL – Monday, September 14
DePaul University Bookstore, 6 pm
1 East Jackson Boulevard
Chicago, IL 60614
depaul-lincolnpark.bncollege.com

Denver, CO – Tuesday, September 15
Tattered Cover Bookstore, 7 pm
2526 E. Colfax Avenue
Denver, CO 80206
tatteredcover.com

Spokane WA – Wednesday, September 16
Auntie’s Bookstore, 7 pm
402 W Main
Spokane, WA 99201
auntiesbooks.com

Tacoma, WA – Thursday, September 17
Fort Lewis-McChord Army Base, 4 pm
(open only to U.S. Military ID card holders)

San Diego, CA – Friday, September 18
Mysterious Galaxy Books, 7:30 pm
5943 Balboa Avenue, Suite #100
San Diego, CA 92111
mystgalaxy.com

Montclair, CA – Wednesday, September 23
Barnes & Noble Montclair Plaza, 7 pm
5183 Montclair Plaza Ln
Montclair, CA 91763
barnesandnoble.com

Salt Lake City, UT – Friday, September 25 and Saturday, September 26
Salt Lake City Comic-Con
Salt Palace Convention Center
100 S. West Temple
Salt Lake City, UT 84101
saltlakecomiccon.com

North Haven, CT – Saturday, October 10
Connecticut Renaissance Faire, 1 pm
300 Washington Ave
North Haven, CT 06473
ctfaire.com

Fitchburg, MA – Thursday, October 22
Fitchburg Public Library, 6:30pm
610 Main Street
Fitchburg, MA 01420
fitchburgpubliclibrary.org



Online Appearances

Kill Pop Culture – Wednesday, August 26
killpopculture.podomatic.com

Reddit Ask Me Anything – Thursday, August 27
reddit.com/r/AMA/
8 pm EST

Dungeons & Dragons Podcast – Friday, September 4
DungeonsandDragons.com

The Grim Tidings Podcast – Saturday, September 12
stitcher.com/podcast/the-grim-tidings-podcast

Dungeon Crawlers Radio – Thursday, October 1
DungeonCrawlersRadio.com
8 pm EST

Can’t be there in person? Reserve your signed copy at rasalvatore.com.

Publication date: 06/23/2015Introduction: Meet the New York Times best-selling author during his 2015 tour for the release of Archmage, Book I in the Homecoming series.Tags: Newsexternal_urls: Texture banner: HideBanner video: 

11 - Gli Eletti - Di Undici Foglie © Dino Olivieri (low res)

Flickr Dungeons and Dragons Tag Feed - Tue, 06/23/2015 - 09:25

! / dino olivieri / www.onyrix.com has added a photo to the pool:

11 - Gli Eletti - Di Undici Foglie © Dino Olivieri (low res)

this is an illustration of my next real book (not an ebook) "Di Undici Foglie".
Support me and pre-order at:
www.kapipal.com/di-undici-foglie


illustrazione tratta dal mio nuovo romanzo cartaceo (non un ebook) "Di Undici Foglie".
Contributi e pre-acquisti su:
www.kapipal.com/di-undici-foglie


Illustration from ebook "Di Undici Foglie" by Dino Olivieri
Luce - Di Undici Foglie © Dino Olivieri (low res)
all rights reserved.

More amazing stories on www.onyrix.com
More productions on www.umamu.org
Follow me at twitter.com/OlivieriDino
FB: www.facebook.com/dino.olivieri.35
Music: soundcloud.com/onyrix
Pins: www.pinterest.com/onyrix/
Videos: www.youtube.com/user/onyrix/

Categories: Dungeons and Dragons

Bone Golem

Flickr Dungeons and Dragons Tag Feed - Mon, 06/22/2015 - 19:41

ridureyu1 has added a photo to the pool:

Bone Golem

Made from the remains of countless victims, a bone golem is most often crafted as a show of necromancer ability, or to guard a tomb.

Categories: Dungeons and Dragons

The Tears of Hell

Flickr Dungeons and Dragons Tag Feed - Mon, 06/22/2015 - 19:41

ridureyu1 has added a photo to the pool:

The Tears of Hell

This version of Multiskull drips balck ichor from its eye sockets.

Categories: Dungeons and Dragons

Multiskull and His Big Brother

Flickr Dungeons and Dragons Tag Feed - Mon, 06/22/2015 - 19:41

ridureyu1 has added a photo to the pool:

Multiskull and His Big Brother

You know, that's... a lot of skulls.

Categories: Dungeons and Dragons

Lady Ghoul

Flickr Dungeons and Dragons Tag Feed - Mon, 06/22/2015 - 19:41

ridureyu1 has added a photo to the pool:

Lady Ghoul

Smarter and more vicious than zombies, Ghoul can also paralyze with a touch.

Categories: Dungeons and Dragons

Painting the Myrmidons, Part 2

Wizards of the Coast D&D - Mon, 06/22/2015 - 18:15
Type: FeaturesAuthor: Daniel GelonSubtitle: Bringing Elemental Evil to LifeBanner: Thumbnail (869x490): Text: 

Art Director Daniel Gelon details the next stage in the Earth Myrmidon painting process. In this segment, Daniel dry brushes the body of the myrmidons and offers more great tips and tricks for those who wish to try this at home.

 

video-sundering

Painting the Myrmidons: Part 2


Publication date: 06/24/2015Introduction: Daniel Gelon continues the painting process of Gale Force Nine’s earth myrmidon.Tags: FeaturesRelated content: Elemental Evilexternal_urls: Texture banner: ShowBanner video: 

Behind the Screens

Wizards of the Coast D&D - Mon, 06/22/2015 - 11:56
Type: FeaturesAuthor: J.M.Subtitle: First-Time Dungeon MasterBanner: Thumbnail (869x490): Text: 

I’m a relatively new D&D player, but I’ve thought about becoming a DM for a long time. I’ve been collecting AD&D adventures since my late teens, but before the prevalence of Google, I wasn’t sure what to do with them and I was too shy to ask.

Recently, more and more of my friends have shown an interest in learning to play. Like me, they felt intimidated by not knowing the rules or how to roleplay. As a group of relatively shy people, playing with strangers sounded even more intimidating to us. So I decided that, even though I was only a new player myself, I would learn how to be a Dungeon Master.

FIRST ENCOUNTERS

My first order of business was to join an existing game in order to better learn the D&D rules. I went to the Wizards of the Coast website and found a D&D Encounters drop-in night at my neighborhood game store. Joining a game full of strangers can be challenging for a shy person, but it was worth it! The group was very friendly and welcoming, both to me and my elf miniatures. The other players happily explained the rules along the way as we embarked on a series of weekly two-hour adventures. I made some new friends, and after a few games, I began to understand the game mechanics and turn actions.

I also started watching games on the Wizards of the Coast D&D YouTube channel to get a better idea of different DM styles. The internet has been a great resource for finding DM tips for new players. I’ve also gotten a lot of tips from seeking out other Dungeon Masters and asking them how they run their games.

ROLLING INITIATIVE

Once I felt comfortable, I set up my first game night with my group. I started with my favorite Wizards of the Coast board game—Dungeon!—which feels to me like D&D for people who have never played before. This game is a great introduction to the mechanics of dice rolling, action and turn order, and the concepts of hit points and armor class. Fighters in the game have a relatively low armor class, so they don’t stand much of a chance against higher-level monsters, but they need the least amount of loot to win. Wizards can teleport and challenge higher-level monsters, but they need to collect more treasure to win. I also saw the game as a low-risk way for my shyer friends to begin to imagine themselves as their characters without being expected to “perform.”

After that first session, we met the following week to play The Lost Mine of Phandelver adventure from the D&D Starter Set. There was some uncertainty at first. What was roleplaying like? How did the rules work? I presented my friends with the pregenerated character sheets, a full set of miniatures, forest images of the Forgotten Realms, forest tiles, and fantasy soundtrack music. I wanted the experience to be visually appealing and immersive. After picking our characters, I had everyone introduce themselves and decide how their backstories were connected. Then we got started on our adventure. It was thrilling to lead my friends through a dungeon crawl in a goblin-infested cave and watch them defeat a goblin boss.

REWARDS AND DEVELOPMENTS

One trick I learned from D&D Encounters nights is to end the session just after a new adventure hook has been set up, to bait the players for the next week’s game. I also learned the importance of encouraging shyer players to take risks in their decision-making. I think D&D is a great venue for players to take initiative, pursue leadership roles, and take risks to achieve goals they might shy away from in real life. This sense of accomplishment could influence the way they feel in their everyday lives.

My first game as DM left me with the impression that I would need to prepare more in the future. It would have been a lot easier to run the game if I had know the adventure hooks and characters a little better in advance. It wasn’t a perfect game, but it was much more accessible to the players than I had imagined. My biggest takeaway from the experience was to just keep working at it, and to not feel intimidated by my status as a new player and DM. I wasn't the perfect Dungeon Master on my first try, but I'm still working at it. Thankfully, my friends are eager to explore the creative possibilities D&D has to offer, and another night of high-fantasy adventure is on the horizon.

About the Author

J.M. works in video production at Wizards of the Coast. Her D&D adventures are inspired by the art of Dave Trampier and heavily art directed on a miniature scale. Her passions are making animations, encouraging female gamers, and media literacy.

Publication date: 06/29/2015Introduction: Running a D&D game had always sounded daunting to me. “Not just anyone can be a DM,” I had heard. “It takes a lot of preparation and experience.” Tags: Behind the Screensexternal_urls: Texture banner: ShowBanner video: 

Venger

Flickr Dungeons and Dragons Tag Feed - Mon, 06/22/2015 - 10:13

Alma de Boneca has added a photo to the pool:

Venger

Filosofia da vida que todos já conhecem: "O de cima sobe e o debaixo desce!" Alma de Boneca: 2149b.iluria.com

Categories: Dungeons and Dragons

Lessons for D&D from the GoT season 5 finale

dungeonmastering.com - Mon, 06/22/2015 - 01:54
Since GoT isn’t just great TV, but also the closest thing to D&D that there will ever be on TV, we here at DungeonMastering assume our readers watch it regularly, even if they don’t...

[[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]

Lady Reaper

Flickr Dungeons and Dragons Tag Feed - Sat, 06/20/2015 - 18:11

ridureyu1 has added a photo to the pool:

Lady Reaper

Hey, look, Death's got a sister!

Categories: Dungeons and Dragons

Magmin

Flickr Dungeons and Dragons Tag Feed - Sat, 06/20/2015 - 18:11

ridureyu1 has added a photo to the pool:

Magmin

These little guys are pure lava. PURE. LAVA.

Categories: Dungeons and Dragons

Ogre Warhulk

Flickr Dungeons and Dragons Tag Feed - Sat, 06/20/2015 - 18:11

ridureyu1 has added a photo to the pool:

Ogre Warhulk

He knows how to do only one thing. And he does it well. (hint: It's smashing)

Categories: Dungeons and Dragons

Yithian

Flickr Dungeons and Dragons Tag Feed - Fri, 06/19/2015 - 17:59

ridureyu1 has added a photo to the pool:

Yithian

Billions of years ago, the Great Race of Yith were earth's dominant species. They built great cities with their advanced technology, and even learned how to travel through time by projecting their minds across the aeons into the bodies of others. In time, they saw their eventual extinction at the hands of the flying Polyps, and so transported themselves far into the future, to a time when the Polys no longer existed.

Categories: Dungeons and Dragons

Mouth Horror

Flickr Dungeons and Dragons Tag Feed - Fri, 06/19/2015 - 17:59

ridureyu1 has added a photo to the pool:

Mouth Horror

Creatures of pure chaos, these aberrations exist only to spread madness and to eat.

Categories: Dungeons and Dragons

Happy Father's Day!

Wizards of the Coast D&D - Fri, 06/19/2015 - 11:00
Type: FeaturesAuthor: Shelly MazzanobleSubtitle: Celebrating D&D StyleBanner: Thumbnail (869x490): Text: 

Dear old dad. Heroic slayer of under-bed lurking monsters, giver (and sometimes) taker of treasure. Whether he’s a father or father figure, show the man in your life how much he means to you with this special card.

Thank you to all the dads out there and enjoy your special day!

Artist: Emi Tanji

Publication date: 06/19/2015Introduction: We Gnoll the Perfect Way to Say “Thanks, Dad!”Tags: Featuresexternal_urls:  External url: http://media.wizards.com/2015/downloads/dnd/060215_DnD_FathersDay.pdfExternal url description: Download the Card Texture banner: HideBanner video: 

The Return of Elemental Evil

Wizards of the Coast D&D - Fri, 06/19/2015 - 11:00
Type: FeaturesAuthor: Shannon AppelclineSubtitle: D&D AlumniBanner: Thumbnail (869x490): Text: 

Appearing in the Princes of the Apocalypse adventure and a new Temple of Elemental Evil board game (not to mention our most recent walkthrough map), Elemental Evil is the heart of D&D’s newest storyline. Its origins go back to some of the earliest D&D lore—most of it focusing on a ruined temple and a small village that had the misfortune to lie near it.

The Origins of the Temple: 1979–1986

At GenCon XII in 1979, TSR released a 16-page Greyhawk adventure called The Village of Hommlet. Written by Gary Gygax, the adventure was a milestone for D&D, marking TSR’s first in-depth depiction of a fully stocked village that adventurers could explore and use as a base of operations. However, Hommlet wasn’t all about talking to farmers and weavers. There was also adventure to be found in a moathouse at the edge of town—and hints of even greater challenges to come.

The moathouse was an outpost for a nearby Temple of Elemental Evil—a “walled fortress” that had long before been sealed by the forces of good fighting the machinations of a “terrible demon.” Many of the nonplayer characters in The Village of Hommlet had their own interests in the temple—for good or ill—and the adventure’s status as a lead-in to further adventures at the temple can be seen in its module code of T1. For more information, DMs were directed to a soon-to-appear follow-up module coded T2, The Temple of Elemental Evil.

As one of the earliest D&D adventures, The Village of Hommlet was published with a monochrome cover. Two years later in 1981, TSR showed its continued commitment to the series by upgrading the original to a full-color cover. However, the follow-up adventure still hadn’t appeared. The problem had previously been discussed in Dragon 35 (March 1980). There, Gygax talked about how his administrative duties at TSR were keeping him from game design. Over the next few years, he would report on more than one occasion that work on T2 was beginning again, but the long-awaited temple adventure never appeared.

In Dragon 90 (October 1984), Gygax finally admitted that he was too busy to finish the adventure. He had thus turned over his three hundred manuscript pages to Frank Mentzer. The result appeared the following August under the module code T1–4. Credited to “Gary Gygax with Frank Mentzer,” The Temple of Elemental Evil was more than just a 16- or 32-page supplement to The Village of Hommlet. Instead, it was a 128-page super-adventure split into four parts. These depicted the original village of Hommlet and its moathouse (a reprint of the original T1 adventure); the nearby village of Nulb and the ruins of the Temple of Elemental Evil; the dungeons beneath the temple; and a series of elemental demiplanes called the “nodes of elemental evil.” Six years after it was first mentioned, the Temple of Elemental Evil was finally complete and available for play.

In the following year, TSR published two more Greyhawk super-adventures: Scourge of the Slave Lords (reprinting the four adventures of the slaver-themed A-series of adventures, and branded as A1–4) and Queen of the Spiders (combining the classic G-series giant adventures, the D-series drow adventures, and the Queen of the Demonweb Pits adventure to be branded GDQ1–7). The three Greyhawk super-adventures were arranged to make it possible to play one after the other—allowing heroes who began their adventuring careers in the village of Hommlet to eventually end up in the Demonweb Pits of the Abyss. Though the origin story of Elemental Evil began small in the village of Hommlet, it ended big as part of one of D&D’s first great adventure paths (the other being the Dragonlance adventures, which also concluded in 1986).



Return to the Temple: 1999–2013

For many years, it seemed as if the stories of Elemental Evil and its temple were done. Though Temple of Elemental Evil was fondly remembered as one of the classic D&D adventures, the game moved on to other tales and other worlds.

That changed in 1999, when Wizards of the Coast started publishing nostalgic returns to the past as part of D&D’s silver anniversary. Against the Giants: The Liberation of Geoff (1999) and Slavers (2000) revisited the classic giants and slavers adventures, as part of a series of a half-dozen adventures that returned to D&D’s old stomping grounds. From 1999 to 2002, a complementary series of Greyhawk Classics novels also appeared.

Elemental Evil finally got its own moment in the nostalgic spotlight in 2001. The Greyhawk Classic novel The Temple of Elemental Evil provided a narrative interpretation of the original adventure, something that was mirrored two years later by the Atari video game The Temple of Elemental Evil: A Classic Greyhawk Adventure. In addition, between these two publications, the temple enjoyed something new: a full sequel to the 1985 adventure.

Return to the Temple of Elemental Evil by Monte Cook appeared in 2001, following up on the events in Gygax and Mentzer’s super-adventure fifteen years later. New players had a chance to visit Hommlet (grown to a large town) and the now-deserted ruins of Nulb. In the process, they learned that evil forces had once more come to haunt the area. Eventually, characters would delve through the ruined remains of the original Temple of Elemental Evil, as well as the new Temple of All-Consumption. In both those ancient lairs, the adventurers learned of even deeper secrets than the ones uncovered by other adventurers a generation before. Like its predecessor, Return to the Temple of Elemental Evil is a classic-style dungeon crawl—and one deeply steeped in Greyhawk lore.

After the publication of Cook’s new megadungeon, Elemental Evil was once more lost to nostalgia. It made some brief returns during the days of fourth edition D&D, but only on a small scale. The Village of Hommlet was updated to fourth edition rules in 2009 by Andy Collins, and released through the RPGA DM Rewards program. Meanwhile, fans of the elements could play The Elder Elemental Eye as the eighth season of D&D Encounters in 2012. It wasn’t exactly Elemental Evil, but it focused on one of the many gods associated with the temple, and tied in with the Heroes of the Elemental Chaos supplement.

Fans of Elemental Evil during the 4e era were probably most interested in Dragon 425 (July 2013). That issue included an extensive historical look at the temple, as well as some discussion of what exactly Elemental Evil was. This was, in fact, a longstanding question, since Elemental Evil had been presented in some confusing ways during its earliest incarnations.



The Gods of the Temple

The story of the Temple of Elemental Evil changed a lot over the years, and those changes have been reflected through the many different gods who have been associated with the temple at different times.

When Gary Gygax first sketched out plans for the temple in The Village of Hommlet, he intended that the spider goddess Lolth would be the temple’s main villain. However, when Lolth became the antagonist of David C. Sutherland III’s Queen of the Demonweb Pits, she was removed from consideration for the temple. Gygax thus considered the single Lolth reference in The Village of Hommlet to be a mistake, and the spider goddess probably should have been expunged from the completed Temple of Elemental Evil. Instead, she remains as a very weak (almost nonexistent) faction within the temple.

Gygax also intended to hide a secret shrine to the Elder Elemental God deep beneath the modern temple—with the god’s power being used and abused by Lolth. This would have more fully explained the presence of Elemental Evil within the temple, but the idea was dropped when Frank Mentzer took over the design of the super-adventure. Ironically, the Elder Elemental God also disappeared from the GDQ series after passing mentions in the giants and drow adventures, when David Sutherland completed that extended series with Queen of the Demonweb Pits.

By the time Mentzer was given Gygax’s notes, the fungus goddess Zuggtmoy had taken over the role of temple villain. Her connection to the elements seemed spurious, but Mentzer explained it as a ruse on the goddess’s part, saying that “Elemental Evil would have more appeal than a cult dedicated to her beloved fungi.” Mentzer also added the cambion Iuz to the mix as another god who contributed to the creation of the temple. Though they didn’t have elemental connections, Iuz and Zuggtmoy did have one advantage over Lolth and the Elder Elemental God: they were more deeply ingrained into the Greyhawk setting.

Over the years, many players found Zuggtmoy at the heart of the Temple of Elemental Evil and were somewhat puzzled by her fungoid presence. Monte Cook finally offered a new explanation a decade and a half later in Return to the Temple of Elemental Evil. He did so by bringing in Tharizdun, a nihilistic god of entropy that Gygax had created for The Forgotten Temple of Tharizdun (1982). Cook explained that Tharizdun had always been the true core of the temple, and that he’d manipulated Zuggtmoy and Iuz into doing his bidding. He also revealed that Tharizdun had another aspect: he was sometimes known as the Elder Elemental Eye.

The revelation that the Elder Elemental God was an aspect of Tharizdun met with mixed reactions among Greyhawk fans. However, that result was actually quite close to Gygax’s first conception of the temple. Originally, an aspect of the Elder Elemental God had been another layer of secrecy hidden beneath Zuggtmoy’s power, providing a more solid association with Elemental Evil.

Cook also introduced another god to his revamped temple: Imix, the Prince of Evil Fire Elementals. He was one of the Elemental Princes of Evil, first published in the Fiend Folio (1981). The inclusion of one of their number in the temple was another nice tie to D&D’s elemental heritage.

Fourteen years after the game’s last major incursion into Gygax’s fabled temple, Elemental Evil is back. What new secrets will be revealed? DMs and players delving into Princes of the Apocalypse will know the answers soon enough.



About the Author

Shannon Appelcline has been roleplaying since his dad taught him Basic D&D in the early ’80s. He’s the editor-in-chief of RPGnet and the author of Designers & Dragons, a four-volume history of the roleplaying industry told one company at a time.

Publication date: 06/19/2015Introduction: Elemental Evil makes a big return this year, building on its long history as part of the Dungeons & Dragons game.Tags: D&D Alumniexternal_urls: Texture banner: HideBanner video: 

Sage Advice

Wizards of the Coast D&D - Thu, 06/18/2015 - 13:21
Type: FeaturesAuthor: Jeremy CrawfordSubtitle: Rules RoundupBanner: Thumbnail (869x490): Text: 

Following the release of corrections for the fifth edition Player’s Handbook on June 10, this installment of Sage Advice presents several reference documents for the game, in the interest of giving D&D groups new tools for making the game work for them.

Next month, we’ll get back to our regular questions and answers, and we’ll begin compiling my most relevant rules answers from Twitter. If you have questions for a future installment of Sage Advice, please send them to sageadvice@wizards.com.

Sage Advice Compendium

Ever since Sage Advice started in January, we’ve received requests to gather it in one place. We’ve listened and created the following PDF to make it easier for you to find answers to your questions:

Sage Advice Compendium (version 1.0)

The PDF not only collects Sage Advice questions to date, but also lists the sources of the game’s official rules. Even better, we’ll expand that document every time we publish Sage Advice (the questions at the end of this column are also included). The PDF will effectively become the FAQ for the game.

Spell Lists

The Player’s Handbook gives you the spell lists of every spellcasting class, but sometimes you might want to find a spell using other criteria. This new PDF lets you find every ritual in one place, as well as look up spells by school of magic or by spell level:

D&D Spell Lists (version 1.0)

The PDF also includes new versions of the class spell lists, which tell you each spell’s school of magic and whether a spell is a ritual.

This resource will be helpful for many of you, particularly those of you playing fighters who have the Eldritch Knight archetype, rogues who have the Arcane Trickster archetype, and warlocks who have the Pact of the Tome feature.

Player’s Handbook Errata

Here’s a link to the latest version of the Player’s Handbook errata document:

Player’s Handbook Errata (version 1.1)

The eagle-eyed Sam Simpson, a member of our customer service team, noticed that the document released on June 10 missed a few details that appear in the third printing of the Player’s Handbook. As a result, we’ve updated the document to version 1.1 to be truly comprehensive. Here’s a list of the parts that have changed since version 1.0:

  • Ranger’s Companion (The document now clarifies that the beast can spend Hit Dice during a short rest.)
  • Wild Magic Surge (A surge can happen once per turn.)
  • Pact of the Tome (The chosen cantrips needn’t be from the same spell list.)
  • Suffocating (The words “or are choking” now appear in the first sentence.)
Errata-Related Questions

Why does the Player’s Handbook errata change X and not Y?
The errata for the first printing of the Player’s Handbook sparked a number of questions. Why did we make the changes we made? Why didn’t we make other changes? Did we change certain things, such as Empowered Evocation, because they were overpowered?

The answer to such questions is straightforward: we fixed mistakes in the text. The errata fixes text that was incomplete or off the mark in the original printing of the book. In the new edition, the errata process is strictly for the correction of such things. Rebalancing and redesigning game elements is the domain of playtesting, Unearthed Arcana articles, new design, and possible revision later in the edition’s lifespan.

We play the game often, and we regularly review Twitter posts, Reddit discussions, website forums, survey results, emails, and customer service reports about the game. You have concerns about the contagion spell? We know about them. You feel the Beastmaster is underpowered? We’ve had our eye on that subclass for a while. In fact, we have a long list of things in the game that we keep an eye on and that we expect to experiment with in the months and years ahead.

But that experimentation is unrelated to errata. Corrections—that’s what errata is about. If you read the errata document and think, “We were already playing Empowered Evocation the way it appears in the errata,” then the errata process is working as intended. It’s not intended to be filled with new design surprises. It’s meant to repair spots where we forgot to tell you something, where we inadvertently told you the wrong thing, or where some of you grasped our design intent and others didn’t, as a result of the text not being clear enough.

Some monsters have resistance or immunity to damage from nonmagical weapons. How is that affected by the change to unarmed strikes in the PH errata?
The change to unarmed strikes is related to a correction coming in the Monster Manual. As corrected, unarmed strikes aren’t weapons, but a character can use them to make melee weapon attacks. Such strikes aren’t meant to bypass a creature’s resistance or immunity to bludgeoning damage from nonmagical weapons.

Here’s a simple fix to use until the Monster Manual errata is released: whenever a stat block refers to resistance or immunity to bludgeoning damage from nonmagical weapons, read that last part as “nonmagical weapon attacks.”

About the Author

Jeremy Crawford is the co-lead designer of fifth edition Dungeons & Dragons, as well as the game’s managing editor. He was the lead designer of the new Player’s Handbook and one of the leads on the Dungeon Master’s Guide. He has worked on many other D&D books since coming to Wizards of the Coast in 2007. You can reach him on Twitter (@JeremyECrawford).

Publication date: 06/22/2015Introduction: Like any heavily used system, the D&D rules undergo ongoing analysis, and occasionally, we like to pause and provide new resources for their current state.Tags: Sage AdviceRelated content: TRPG_DMGTRPG_PHBexternal_urls:  External url: http://media.wizards.com/2015/downloads/dnd/SA_Compendium_1.0.pdfExternal url description: Sage Advice Compendium 1.0 External url: http://media.wizards.com/2015/downloads/dnd/PH_Errata_1.1.pdfExternal url description: Player's Handbook Errata External url: http://media.wizards.com/2015/downloads/dnd/DnD_SpellLists_1.0.pdfExternal url description: D&D Spell Lists 1.0 Texture banner: ShowBanner video: 
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